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Diffusion tensor fiber tracking shows distinct corticostriatal circuits in humans

Authors

  • Stéphane Lehéricy MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN
    2. Department of Neuroradiology, CHU Salpètrière, Paris
    3. Department of Neurology, CHU Salpetrière, Paris
    4. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
    • CMRR, 2021 6th Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
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  • Mathieu Ducros PhD,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Pierre-François Van De Moortele MD, PhD,

    1. Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Chantal Francois PhD,

    1. Inserm U289, Paris
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Lionel Thivard MD,

    1. Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie et Nouvelles Microscopies ESPCI-INSERM EPI 00-02, Paris
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Cyril Poupon PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, CHU Salpetrière, Paris
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Nick Swindale PhD,

    1. Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, CEA, Orsay, France
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Kamil Ugurbil PhD,

    1. Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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  • Dae-Shik Kim PhD

    1. Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
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Abstract

A landmark of corticostriatal connectivity in nonhuman primates is that cortical connections are organized into a set of discrete circuits. Each circuit is assumed to perform distinct behavioral functions. In animals, most connectivity studies are performed using invasive tracing methods, which are nonapplicable in humans. To test the proposal that corticostriatal connections are organized as multiple circuits in humans, we used diffusion tensor imaging axonal tracking, a new magnetic resonance technique that allows demonstration of fiber tracts in a noninvasive manner. Diffusion tensor imaging–based fiber tracking showed that the posterior (sensorimotor), anterior (associative), and ventral (limbic) compartments of the human striatum have specific connections with the cortex, and particularly the frontal lobes. These results provide the first direct demonstration of distinct corticostriatal connections in humans.

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