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Ketogenic treatment reduces deleted mitochondrial DNAs in cultured human cells

Authors

  • Sumana Santra PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. NY
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  • Robert W. Gilkerson PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. NY
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  • Mercy Davidson PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. NY
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  • Eric A. Schon PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. NY
    2. Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. NY
    • Department of Neurology, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032
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Abstract

Impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism has been associated with a wide range of human disorders. Large-scale partial deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause sporadic Kearns–Sayre syndrome, a fatal multisystem disorder, in which the majority of mtDNAs in affected tissues have deletions (Δ-mtDNAs). Since most mtDNA-related diseases, including Kearns–Sayre syndrome, are recessive, only a few wild-type mtDNAs can compensate for the deleterious effects of many Δ-mtDNAs. We have developed a pharmacological approach to reduce the proportion of Δ-mtDNAs in vitro, in which we grow cells in medium containing ketone bodies, replacing glucose as the carbon source. Cells containing 100% Δ-mtDNA died after 5 days of treatment, whereas those containing 100% wild-type mtDNA survived. Furthermore, in a cloned heteroplasmic cell line, the proportion of wild-type mtDNA increased from 13% initially to approximately 22% after 5 days in ketogenic medium and was accompanied by a dramatic improvement in mitochondrial protein synthesis. We also present evidence that treatment with ketone bodies caused “heteroplasmic shifting” not only among cells (ie, intercellular selection) but also within cells (ie, intracellular selection). The demonstration that ketone bodies can distinguish between normal and respiratorily compromised cells points to the potential use of a ketogenic diet to treat patients with heteroplasmic mtDNA disorders. Ann Neurol 2004

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