Increased midbrain gray matter in Tourette's syndrome

Authors

  • Gaëtan Garraux MD, PhD,

    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    2. Cyclotron Research Center and Department of Neurology, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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  • Andrew Goldfine MD,

    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
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  • Stephan Bohlhalter MD,

    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
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  • Alicja Lerner MD, PhD,

    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
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  • Takashi Hanakawa MD, PhD,

    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
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  • Mark Hallett MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Human Motor Control Section, Medical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    • Human Motor Control Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N226, 10 Center Dr., MSC 1428, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428
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Abstract

Objective

To investigate cerebral structure in Tourette's syndrome (TS).

Methods

Voxel-based morphometry study of high-resolution MRIs in 31 TS patients compared with 31 controls.

Results

Increased gray matter mainly in the left mesencephalon in 31 TS patients.

Interpretation

This result constitutes strong and direct evidence supporting Devinsky's hypothesis (Devinsky O. Neuroanatomy of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome. Possible midbrain involvement. Arch Neurol 1983;40:508–514) according to which midbrain disturbances play an important pathogenic role in TS. Ann Neurol 2006;59:381–385

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