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Increased frontoparietal integration after stroke and cognitive recovery

Authors

  • David J. Sharp PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
    2. MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
    • The Cyclotron Building, The Clinical Sciences Centre, The Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College London, London, UK, W12 0NN
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  • Federico E. Turkheimer PhD,

    1. Division of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
    2. MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
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  • Subrata K. Bose PhD,

    1. MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
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  • Sophie K. Scott PhD,

    1. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
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  • Richard J. S. Wise MD

    1. Division of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
    2. MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK
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Abstract

The neural mechanism by which patients spontaneously recover cognitive function after brain injury is not understood. Here we demonstrate for the first time that aphasic patients, who have largely recovered language function, show increased frontoparietal integration. A similar change in functional connectivity is also observed when normal subjects are exposed to adverse listening conditions. Thus, compensation for inefficient language processing is associated with increased integration between parts of the language network critical to language control. This change reflects greater top-down control of speech comprehension and provides a mechanism by which language impairments after stroke may be compensated for. ANN NEUROL 2010

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