Sleep induced by stimulation in the human pedunculopontine nucleus area

Authors

  • Isabelle Arnulf MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sleep Disorders Unit, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM: National Institute of Health and Medical Research) UMR_975 (Mixed Unity of Research), Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Assistance Publique—Hopitaux de Paris (Public Hospitals of Paris), Paris 6 University, Paris, France
    • Unité des pathologies du sommeil, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83 boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
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  • Muriel Ferraye MD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
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  • Valérie Fraix MD, PhD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
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  • Alim Louis Benabid MD, PhD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
    2. University Hospital of Grenoble, France
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  • Stephan Chabardès MD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
    2. University Hospital of Grenoble, France
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  • Laurent Goetz MD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
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  • Pierre Pollak MD, PhD,

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
    2. University Hospital of Grenoble, France
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  • Bettina Debû PhD

    1. Grenoble University, France, and INSERM U836, Grenoble Institute of Neurosciences, France
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Abstract

The pedunculopontine nucleus is part of the reticular ascending arousal system and is involved in locomotion and sleep. Two patients with Parkinson disease received electrodes that stimulated the pedunculopontine nucleus area to alleviate their severe gait impairment. Instead, we found that low-frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area increased alertness, whereas high-frequency stimulation induced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In addition, the sudden withdrawal of the low-frequency stimulation was consistently followed by rapid eye movement sleep episodes in 1 patient. These data have the potential to benefit patients who suffer from sleep disorders. ANN NEUROL 2010;67:546–549

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