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Gait alterations in healthy carriers of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation

Authors

  • Anat Mirelman PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of NeurologyTel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    • Laboratory for Gait Analysis and Neurodynamics, Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizmann Street, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel
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  • Tanya Gurevich MD,

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of NeurologyTel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. NeurologyTel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    3. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • Nir Giladi MD,

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of NeurologyTel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. NeurologyTel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    3. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • Anat Bar-Shira PhD,

    1. Genetics Institute, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • Avi Orr-Urtreger MD, PhD,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. Genetics Institute, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • Jeffrey M. Hausdorff PhD

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of NeurologyTel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. Departments of Physical TherapyTel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    3. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Potential conflict of interest: The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Abstract

To test for an association between the LRRK2-G2019S mutation and gait, we studied 52 first-degree relatives of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who carry this mutation. An accelerometer quantified gait during usual-walking, fast-walking, and dual-tasking. Noncarriers (n = 27) and carriers (n = 25) were similar with respect to age, gender, height, and gait speed during all conditions. During dual-tasking and fast-walking, gait variability and the amplitude of the dominant peak of the accelerometer signal were significantly altered among the carriers. These findings support the possibility of previously unidentified, presymptomatic motor changes among relatives who have an increased risk of developing PD. Ann Neurol 2010

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