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Identifying the perfusion deficit in acute stroke with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

Authors

  • Yating Lv MS,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    2. Mind and Brain Institute and Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Charité and Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
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  • Daniel S. Margulies Dr. rer. nat.,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    2. Mind and Brain Institute and Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Charité and Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
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  • R. Cameron Craddock PhD,

    1. Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Roanoke, VA
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  • Xiangyu Long BS,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
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  • Benjamin Winter Dr. med,

    1. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
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  • Daniel Gierhake,

    1. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
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  • Matthias Endres Prof. Dr. med.,

    1. Mind and Brain Institute and Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Charité and Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
    2. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    3. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    4. Neurocure Cluster of Excellence, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
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  • Kersten Villringer Dr. med.,

    1. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
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  • Jochen Fiebach Priv.-Doz. Dr. med.,

    1. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
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  • Arno Villringer Prof. Dr. med.

    Corresponding author
    1. Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
    2. Mind and Brain Institute and Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Charité and Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
    3. Center for Stroke Research, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    4. Department of Neurology, Charité–Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
    • Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Department of Neurology, Stephanstrasse 1A, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
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Abstract

Temporal delay in blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) signals may be sensitive to perfusion deficits in acute stroke. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) was added to a standard stroke MRI protocol. We calculated the time delay between the BOLD signal at each voxel and the whole-brain signal using time-lagged correlation and compared the results to mean transit time derived using bolus tracking. In all 11 patients, areas exhibiting significant delay in BOLD signal corresponded to areas of hypoperfusion identified by contrast-based perfusion MRI. Time delay analysis of rsfMRI provides information comparable to that of conventional perfusion MRI without the need for contrast agents. ANN NEUROL 2013.

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