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Fig S1 – Immunoreactivity of amylin antibody in solutions of recombinant amylin vs Aβ.

Fig S2 – Specificity of amylin antibody on western blot.

Fig S3 – Electrophoretic pattern of amylin analyzed with two different antibodies (top). Both antibodies effectively stain amylin deposits (bottom).

Fig S4 – Electrophoretic patterns of amylin and proamylin in brain protein homogenates.

Fig S5 - Typical distribution of amylin plaques in brain parenchyma of diabetic patients without vascular dementia (T2D-D).

Fig S6 – Typical distribution of amylin plaques in brain parenchyma of AD patients without T2D (AD group).

Fig S7 – Typical distribution of amylin plaques in brain parenchyma of humans in the control group.

Fig S8 – Serial staining with anti-amylin antibody, anti-Aβ antibody, and Congo red of a brain sample from a T2D patient with vascular dementia. The lower panel at the right shows the Congo red stain of the same tissue area under a polarized light microscope. Amylin deposits exhibit apple-green birefringence demonstrating that amylin forms amyloid-like structure in the brain.

Table 1 - Etiology of cerebral and vascular disorders, age, gender, and diabetes status of T2D cases with cerebrovascular disease and dementia (T2D-D group).

Table 2 - Etiology of cerebral and vascular disorders, age, and gender of AD cases without overt T2D (AD group).

Table 3 – Gender and age of cases in the control group.

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