Cerebral hypoperfusion in the sudden infant death syndrome? brainstem gliosis and vasculature

Authors

  • S. Takashima,

    MD
    1. Departments of Pathology and Respiratory Physiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto, Ont, Canada
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  • D. Armstrong FRCP(C),

    1. Departments of Pathology and Respiratory Physiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto, Ont, Canada
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  • Dr. L. Becker FRCP(C),

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Pathology and Respiratory Physiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto, Ont, Canada
    • Department of Pathology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Ave, Toronto, Ont, Canada M5G 1X8
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  • C. Bryan FRCP(C)

    1. Departments of Pathology and Respiratory Physiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto, Ont, Canada
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Abstract

Gliosis is increased in the respiratory control area of the brainstem in victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), as it is in infants who have died of congenital heart disease. In the latter, the lesions appear to result from hypoxia or ischemia, and studies of the brainstem microvasculature of SIDS victims indicated a close relationship between the gliosis and adjacent vasculature. It is postulated that cerebral hypoperfusion may play a role in SIDS.

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