Occipital horn asymmetry in children

Authors

  • Esther Strauss PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, and the Department of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont, Canada
    • Department of Psychology, PO Box 1700, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 2Y2
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  • Charles Fitz MD

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, and the Department of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont, Canada
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Abstract

In 75 young neurological patients ranging in age from 5 months to nearly 18 years, the left occipital horn was longer than the right in 29 instances whereas the right was longer than the left in only 13 cases (p < 0.025). Elongations of the right occipital horn as well as symmetrical horns were associated with cerebral damage incurred prior to the end of the first year of life (p = 0.06).

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