Antibody responses to measles virus and canine distemper virus in multiple sclerosis

Authors

  • Dr Steven Krakowka DVM, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
    • 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210
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  • James A. Miele MS,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
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  • Lawrence E. Mathes PhD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
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  • Alfred E. Metzler,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
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  • Dr Med Vet

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Virology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

Age-matched serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 20 multiple sclerosis patients and 20 control patients with other neurological diseases were examined for antibodies to radiolabeled measles virus and canine distemper virus using an immunoprecipitation polyacrylamide gel technique. No evidence for reactivity to unique canine distemper virus-virion polypeptides in the multiple sclerosis group was obtained. Competitive binding experiments with cerebrospinal fluid using labeled and unlabeled viral antigens failed to detect preferences in binding of antibodies for canine distemper virus versus measles virus. Cerebrospinal fluid samples tested for antiviral immunoglobulin M activity using both measles and canine distemper viruses showed no activity. The results of this study failed to implicate canine distemper virus directly as a cause of multiple sclerosis.

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