Dissociated neglect behavior following sequential strokes in the right hemisphere

Authors

  • Dr Kirk R. Daffner MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Bullard and Denny-Brown Laboratories, the Division of Behavioral Neurology and Neurosciene of the Harvard Neurology Department, and the Charles A. Dana Research Institute of the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA
    • Daffner, Behavioral Neurology Unit, Beth Israel Hospital, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Geoffrey L. Ahern MD, PhD,

    1. Bullard and Denny-Brown Laboratories, the Division of Behavioral Neurology and Neurosciene of the Harvard Neurology Department, and the Charles A. Dana Research Institute of the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA
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  • Sandra Weintraub PhD,

    1. Bullard and Denny-Brown Laboratories, the Division of Behavioral Neurology and Neurosciene of the Harvard Neurology Department, and the Charles A. Dana Research Institute of the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA
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  • M-Marsel Mesulam MD

    1. Bullard and Denny-Brown Laboratories, the Division of Behavioral Neurology and Neurosciene of the Harvard Neurology Department, and the Charles A. Dana Research Institute of the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA
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Abstract

A 42-year-old woman suffered two focal right hemisphere strokes, sequentially damaging different components of a proposed cerebral network for the spatial distribution of attention. Her first stroke was centered in the right frontal lobe and resulted in left hemispatial neglect but only for tasks that emphasize exploratory-motor components of directed attention. A second stroke occurred 20 days later in the parietal lobe and led to the emergence of perceptual-sensory aspects of neglect. This case strongly supports the existence of a distributed anatomic-functional network subserving directed attention.

Ancillary