Apolipoprotein E ϵ4 in inclusion body myositis

Authors

  • Michael J. Garlepp PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
    • Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Verdun Street, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 Australia
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  • Hyacinth Tabarias,

    1. Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
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  • Frank M. van Bockxmeer PhD,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Paul J. Zilko MD,

    1. Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
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  • Beverley Laing,

    1. Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
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  • Frank L. Mastaglia MD

    1. Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands
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Abstract

The genetic predisposition to inclusion body myositis (IBM) is probably multifactorial. The deposition of the β-amyloid protein is a characteristic histological feature of both IBM and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ϵ4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APO E) has been strongly associated with familial and late-onset AD. We therefore compared the APO E allele frequencies in a group of 14 patients with IBM with those in a group of patients with other inflammatory muscle diseases and in the general population. The frequency of the ϵ4 allele in IBM was increased (0.29) compared with that in patients with other inflammatory muscle diseases (0.15) and the general population (0.13) (p < 0.05). These data suggest that APO E genotype may be one of the factors involved in determining the predisposition to the development of IBM.

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