Annalen der Physik

Cover image for Vol. 524 Issue 11

Special Issue: Plasmonic Sensors

November 2012

Volume 524, Issue 11

Pages A145–A162, 619–756, L5–L10

Issue edited by: Stefan A. Maier, Mikael Käll, Liberato Manna

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Paper
    6. Contents
    7. Advisory Board
    8. Retrospect
    9. New Features
    10. Editorial
    11. Physics Forum
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Review Articles
    14. Original Papers
    15. Rapid Research Letter
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      Cover Picture: Ann. Phys. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biocompatible, gold nanoparticle functionalized calcium carbonate particles are shown to serve as effective label-free Raman biosensors. Biologically relevant molecules – glucose and bovine serum albumin – have been detected using these new approach. Picture: A. M. Yashchenok et al., pp. 723, in this issue.

  2. Back Cover

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    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Paper
    6. Contents
    7. Advisory Board
    8. Retrospect
    9. New Features
    10. Editorial
    11. Physics Forum
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Review Articles
    14. Original Papers
    15. Rapid Research Letter
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      Back Cover: Ann. Phys. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new plasmonic biosensing device based on ultrasmooth metallic surfaces with buried plasmonic nanostructures is presented. Using template stripping, ultrathin gold films with less than 5 Å surface roughness are optically coupled to buried plasmonic gratings. Because of this arrangement, light only need illuminate the buried gratings, and sensing with opaque or highly scattering liquids is possible. Picture: N. C. Lindquist et al., pp. 687, in this issue.

  3. Issue Information

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    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Paper
    6. Contents
    7. Advisory Board
    8. Retrospect
    9. New Features
    10. Editorial
    11. Physics Forum
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Review Articles
    14. Original Papers
    15. Rapid Research Letter
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      Issue Information: Ann. Phys. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290019

  4. Call for Paper

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      Call for Papers: Ann. Phys. 11/2012 (page A145)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290020

  5. Contents

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    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Paper
    6. Contents
    7. Advisory Board
    8. Retrospect
    9. New Features
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    12. Frontispiece
    13. Review Articles
    14. Original Papers
    15. Rapid Research Letter
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      Contents: Ann. Phys. 11/2012 (pages A146–A151)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200749

  6. Advisory Board

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      The AdP Advisory Board (page A152)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200751

  7. Retrospect

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    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Paper
    6. Contents
    7. Advisory Board
    8. Retrospect
    9. New Features
    10. Editorial
    11. Physics Forum
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Review Articles
    14. Original Papers
    15. Rapid Research Letter
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  8. New Features

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      What' New (page A154)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200752

  9. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    4. Issue Information
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      Editorial: Plasmonic sensors (page A155)

      S. Maier, M. Käll and L. Manna

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200753

  10. Physics Forum

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    1. Then & Now

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      From the Red Drop to the Z-scheme of photosynthesis (pages A157–A160)

      K. Nickelsen

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200748

    2. Expert Opinion

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      SERS under magnetic control (pages A161–A162)

      Q.-H. Xu

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200754

  11. Frontispiece

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    4. Issue Information
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      Frontispiece: Nanoplasmonic structures for biophotonic applications: SERS overview (page 619)

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290016

      Under Enzo Di Fabrizio, group leader, Nanostructures Div. at IIT, Genova, various nanoplasmonic devices were fabricated using top-down method such as electron beam lithography, electroplating and focused ion beam techniques. These substrates were investigated after depositing the molecules from dye to protein, using chemisorptions techniques. Theoretical simulations were also performed on these model nanostructures in order to understand the electrical field distribution. Furthermore, the future prospects of these nanostructures were also mentioned in this report by A. Gopalakrishnan et al. (pp. 620–636)

  12. Review Articles

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      Nanoplasmonic structures for biophotonic applications: SERS overview (pages 620–636)

      A. Gopalakrishnan, M. Malerba, S. Tuccio, S. Panaro, E. Miele, M. Chirumamilla, S. Santoriello, C. Dorigoni, A. Giugni, R. Proietti Zaccaria, C. Liberale, F. De Angelis, L. Razzari, R. Krahne, A. Toma, G. Das and E. Di Fabrizio

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200145

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various nanoplasmonic devices can be fabricated using top-down methods such as electron beam lithography, electroplating and focused ion beam techniques. The substrates can be investigated after depositing the molecules from the dye to the protein, using chemisorptions techniques. Theoretical simulations are presented on these model nanostructures in order to understand the electrical field distribution.

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      Phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensors: methodology, instrumentation and applications (pages 637–662)

      Y.H. Huang, H.P. Ho, S.K. Kong and A.V. Kabashin

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) has become a central tool for label-free characterization of biomolecular interactions. Conventional SPR sensors have been extensively explored and applied, but it still lacks sensitivity for the detection of relatively small and low copy number compounds. Phase-sensitive SPR has recently emerged as an upgrade of this technology, which enables to solve the sensitivity problem. This paper provides a tutorial on phase detection in SPR sensing.

  13. Original Papers

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    1. An array of surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates based on plasmonic lenses (pages 663–669)

      M. Kahraman, S. Cakmakyapan, E. Ozbay and M. Culha

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An array of ring-shaped holes is prepared from silver thin films using electron beam lithography. The optimal conditions for high performance as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate are investigated. It is found that there is an optimal configuration for ring-shaped holes with a 3.0-µm diameter and 200-nm slit with. The SERS activity on this optimal lens configuration is found to be 13 times greater than that of the activity on the silver thin film.

    2. Magnetic Fe3O4-Au core-shell nanostructures for surface enhanced Raman scattering (pages 670–679)

      D.A. Wheeler, S.A. Adams, T. López-Luke, A. Torres-Castro and J.Z. Zhang

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis, structural and optical characterization, and application of superparamagnetic and water-dispersed Fe3O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is reported. The structure of the nanoparticles was determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

    3. Prism dispersion effects in near-guided-wave surface plasmon resonance sensors (pages 680–686)

      A. Shalabney and I. Abdulhalim

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Refractive index dispersion causes the light line to curve. As a result it is shown that when the prism is dispersive, an additional dip in the spectral response of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors is observed in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration. Since the new dip evolves in the infrared region, it exhibits a high sensitivity to the analyte refractive index changes and the mode penetrates deeper into the analyte.

    4. Ultrasmooth metallic films with buried nanostructures for backside reflection-mode plasmonic biosensing (pages 687–696)

      N.C. Lindquist, T.W. Johnson, J. Jose, L.M. Otto and S.-H. Oh

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new plasmonic device architecture based on ultrasmooth metallic surfaces with buried plasmonic nanostructures is presented. Using template-stripping techniques, ultrathin gold films with less than 5 Å surface roughness are optically coupled to an arbitrary arrangement of buried metallic gratings, rings, and nanodots. As a prototypical example, linear plasmonic gratings buried under an ultrasmooth 20 nm thick gold surface for biosensing are presented.

    5. Plasmonics and single-molecule detection in evaporated silver-island films (pages 697–704)

      G. Moula, R. Rodriguez-Oliveros, P. Albella, J.A. Sanchez-Gil and R.F. Aroca

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface plasmon coupling in silver-island films (SIF) creates hot spots. The best simple computational model for the SIF on glass is that of the hemispherical dimers, given a plasmon in full agreement with the observed plasmon absorption. Detecting the hot spots, using surface enhanced Raman scattering, is realized using SIFs coated with a monomolecular layer, in which the target molecule is present as a dopant.

    6. Fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor based on plasmonic light scattering interrogation (pages 705–712)

      H.-Y. Lin, C.-H. Huang and L.-K. Chau

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly sensitive fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor (FO-PPR) is demonstrated for label-free biochemical detection. The sensing strategy relies on interrogating the plasmonic scattering of light from gold nanoparticles on the optical fiber in response to the surrounding refractive index changes or molecular binding events.

    7. Comparative assessment of the sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance transducers and interference-based Fabry-Pérot transducers (pages 713–722)

      O. Kedem, A. Vaskevich and I. Rubinstein

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) transducers have been widely investigated for use in sensing applications. An alternative approach based on interference from thin films (Fabry-Pérot interferometers) has been previously advanced, offering a rather high sensitivity. Here, the sensitivity offered by typical transducers of the two kinds in a usual sensing scenario is compared and their respective advantages are discussed.

    8. Nanoplasmonic smooth silica versus porous calcium carbonate bead biosensors for detection of biomarkers (pages 723–732)

      A.M. Yashchenok, D. Borisova, B.V. Parakhonskiy, A. Masic, B. Pinchasik, H. Möhwald and A.G. Skirtach

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoplasmonic biosensors based on gold nanoparticle functionalized smooth silica and porous calcium carbonate particles is presented. In this comparative study the role of porosity for adsorbing gold nanoparticles and the subsequent detection of biomarkers is identified.

    9. Surface plasmon-enhanced molecular fluorescence induced by gold nanostructures (pages 733–740)

      Y. Teng, K. Ueno, X. Shi, D. Aoyo, J. Qiu and H. Misawa

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence of Eosin Y molecules induced by gold nanostructures is investigated. Al2O3 films deposited by atomic layer deposition with sub-nanometer resolution are used as the spacer layer to control the distance between molecules and the gold surface.

    10. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating (pages 741–750)

      B. Abel and K. Aslan

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials.

    11. Optical excitation of acoustic surface plasmons in metallic nanoparticles (pages 751–756)

      M. Hrton, M.A. Poyli, V.M. Silkin and J. Aizpurua

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Acoustic surface plasmons are low energy collective excitations occurring at metallic surfaces. These excitations show a linear dispersion which can be described using realistic quantum-mechanical models. The response function of Ag(111) films is calculated and an effective dielectric function of the films is obtained. With use of this dielectric function the scattering of silver nanoparticles in the infrared range is calculated.

  14. Rapid Research Letter

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    1. Laser fabricated ripple substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (pages L5–L10)

      R. Buividas, P.R. Stoddart and S. Juodkazis

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Femtosecond laser fabricated surface nanograting structures, referred to as ripples, are proposed as efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Ripple substrates show order of magnitude higher sensitivity and superior reproducibility as compared to lithographically made commercial SERS sensing substrates. It is demonstrated that the SERS intensity from ripple substrates scales with the thickness of the Au coating.

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