Annalen der Physik

Cover image for Vol. 524 Issue 9‐10

Special Issue: Dark Matter

October 2012

Volume 524, Issue 9-10

Pages A125–A143, 479–617

Issue edited by: Matthias Bartelmann, Volker Springel

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Ann. Phys. 9–10/2012

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of a standard model of cosmological structure formation over the last forty years must count as one of the great success stories in Physics. The model describes the geometry and material content of the Universe, explaining how structure – galaxies of various sizes and types, groups and clusters of galaxies, the entire cosmic web of filaments and voids – emerged from a hot and near-uniform Big Bang. In this issue the article Dark matter and cosmic structure by Carlos S. Frenk and Simon D. M. White (pp. 507–534) reviews the standard model of cosmic structure formation, focusing on the nonlinear processes that transformed the near-uniform universe that emerged from the Big Bang into the highly structured world we observe today. The image shows the warm dark matter halo at z = 0 of the Aquarius simulations (Aq-A). The figure is roughly 1.5 Mpc on a side.

  2. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information: Ann. Phys. 9–10/2012

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290014

  3. Call for Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
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      Call for Papers: Ann. Phys. 9–10/2012 (page A125)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201290015

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Ann. Phys. 9–10/2012 (pages A126–A129)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200747

  5. Advisory Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
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      The AdP Advisory Board (page A130)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200741

  6. Retrospect

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  7. New Features

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      What' New (page A132)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200743

  8. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
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      Editorial: Special Issue: Dark Matter (pages A133–A134)

      M. Bartelmann and V. Springel

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200744

  9. Physics Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. Then & Now

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    2. Expert Opinion

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      Galaxy properties as tests of ΛCDM (pages A139–A141)

      G. Kauffmann

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200738

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      The dark matter zoo: Still space for diversity (pages A142–A143)

      L. Amendola

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200740

  10. Review Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
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      Dark matter evidence, particle physics candidates and detection methods (pages 479–496)

      L. Bergström

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The problem of the dark matter in the universe is reviewed. A short history of the dark matter problem is given, and several of the most obvious particle candidates for dark matter are identified. Particular focus is given to weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) of which the lightest supersymmetric particle is an interesting special case and a useful template.

  11. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
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      Dark matter particles in the galactic halo: DAMA/LIBRA results and perspectives (pages 497–506)

      R. Bernabei

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Most of the Universe is Dark and a large fraction of it should be made of relic particles. In this review the DAMA/LIBRA results are described. In particular, the DAMA/LIBRA experiment is mainly devoted to the investigation of dark matter particles in the Galactic halo by exploiting the model independent dark matter annual modulation signature.

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      Dark matter and cosmic structure (pages 507–534)

      C.S. Frenk and S.D.M. White

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The current standard model for the evolution of cosmic structure is reviewed, tracing its development over the last forty years and focussing specifically on the role played by numerical simulations and on aspects related to the nature of dark matter.

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      Triumphs and tribulations of ΛCDM, the double dark theory (pages 535–544)

      J.R. Primack

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The “too big to fail” (TBTF) problem challenges ΛCDM. It arose from analysis of the Acquarius and Via Lactea very high-resolution ΛCDM simulations of dark matter halos. Each simulated halo has ∼ 10 subhalos that were so massive and dense that they would appear to be too big to fail to form lots of stars. The TBTF problem is that none of the observed satellite galaxies of the Milky Way or Andromeda have stars moving as fast as would be expected in these densest subhalos. This may indicate the need for a more complex theory of dark matter.

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      The dark matter problem from f(R) gravity viewpoint (pages 545–578)

      S. Capozziello and M. De Laurentis

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An alternative view to the dark matter puzzle is represented by Extended Theories of Gravity, e.g. by extending the Hilbert-Einstein action of gravitational field to more general actions (e.g. f (R) gravity). The approach consists in addressing issues like dark components from the point of view of gravitational field instead of requiring new material ingredients that, up to now, have not been detected at fundamental level.

  12. Original Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Call for Papers
    5. Contents
    6. Advisory Board
    7. Retrospect
    8. New Features
    9. Editorial
    10. Physics Forum
    11. Review Paper
    12. Review Articles
    13. Original Papers
    1. Abelian dark matter models for 511 keV γ rays and direct detection (pages 579–590)

      J.M. Cline and A.R. Frey

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors construct a simple U(1) hidden sector model of metastable dark matter that could explain excess 511 keV gamma rays from the galactic center as observed by INTEGRAL, through inelastic scattering of dark matter followed by its decay. Although the model is highly constrained, it naturally accommodates dark matter with mass and cross section in the range suggested by the CoGeNT and CRESST experiments.

    2. Evanescent matter (pages 591–601)

      P.J.E. Peebles

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ΛCDM cosmology offers a picture for galaxy formation that is broadly promising but difficult to reconcile with the evidence that galaxies were assembled earlier than seems naturally to follow from this cosmology, and that environment has had strikingly little effect on the evolution of ellipticals and pure disk spiral galaxies after assembly. Reconciliation might be aided by adding to ΛCDM evanescent matter that has an evolving mass and a fifth force large enough to aid earlier assembly of more nearly isolated protogalaxies.

    3. Multiple dark matter as a self-regulating mechanism for dark sector interactions (pages 602–617)

      M. Baldi

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/andp.201200073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The present cosmological constraints and the absence of a direct detection and identification of any dark matter particle candidate leave room to the possibility that the dark sector of the Universe be actually more complex than it is normally assumed. In particular, more than one new fundamental particle could be responsible for the observed dark matter density in the Universe.

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