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Biomimetic Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes by Using Cell Surface Mucin Mimics

Authors

  • Xing Chen,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Goo Soo Lee Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • A. Zettl Prof.,

    1. Department of Physics, University of California and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, Fax: (+1) 510-643-8497
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  • Carolyn R. Bertozzi Prof.

    1. Departments of Chemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, Fax: (+1) 510-643-2628
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  • The authors thank N. Bodzin for assistance with graphics as well as W. Han and R. Zalpuri for help with TEM experiments. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098, within the Interfacing Nanostructures Initiative.

Abstract

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Biokompatible Nanoröhren: Glycosylierte Polymere, die natürliche Mucine imitieren, wurden auf Kohlenstoffnanoröhren aufgebaut (siehe Bild). Die mit Mucin-Mimetika überzogenen Kohlenstoffnanoröhren sind wasserlöslich und zeigen keine unspezifische Proteinbindung, sondern binden gezielt durch Rezeptor-Ligand-Wechselwirkungen an Biomoleküle.

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