Engineering a 2D Protein–DNA Crystal

Authors

  • Jonathan Malo,

    1. Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK, Fax: (+44) 1865-272-400
    2. Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • James C. Mitchell Dr.,

    1. Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK, Fax: (+44) 1865-272-400
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Catherine Vénien-Bryan Dr.,

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • J. Robin Harris Prof.,

    1. Institute of Zoology, University of Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany
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  • Holger Wille Prof.,

    1. Department of Neurology and Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
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  • David J. Sherratt Prof.,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
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  • Andrew J. Turberfield Prof.

    1. Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK, Fax: (+44) 1865-272-400
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  • This work was supported by the Wellcome Trust, the MoD, and the UK research councils BBSRC, EPSRC, and MRC through the UK Bionanotechnology IRC. We thank Prof. Louise Johnson of the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Oxford, for her advice, and Prof. Werner Kuhlbrandt, Dr. Janet Vonck, and Mr. Deryck Mills of the MPI for Biophysics, Frankfurt, for the use of their cryo-EM facilities and for their assistance in the cryo-EM imaging of the RuvA–HJ lattices.

Abstract

original image

Weben mit DNA: Mit einem DNA-bindenden Protein lässt sich die Struktur eines selbstorganisierten 2D-Kristalls steuern. Ohne das Protein hybridisieren vier Oligonucleotide zu miteinander verwobenen Doppelhelices mit p3-Symmetrie (siehe Bild). Zugabe des Proteins RuvA während der Selbstorganisation ändert die Symmetrie und Verknüpfung, und es resultiert ein DNA-Protein-Kristall mit annähernd quadratischer Elementarzelle.

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