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A Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Responsive Polymer for Safe, Efficient, and Targeted Gene Delivery in Cancer Cells

Authors

  • Dr. Min Suk Shim,

    1. The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry and School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    2. Current address: Division of Bioengineering, Incheon National University (Republic of Korea)
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  • Prof. Younan Xia

    Corresponding author
    1. The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry and School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    • The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry and School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)

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  • This work was supported in part by a 2006 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (DP1 OD000798) and start-up funds from Georgia Institute of Technology. The authors thank Dennis Oakley of the Bakewell Neuroimaging Core at Washington University School of Medicine for assistance with some of the confocal microscopy imaging studies.

Abstract

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Stimulierte Freisetzung: Die hohe Konzentration reaktiver Sauerstoffspezies (ROS) in Prostata-Krebszellen lässt sich für den gezielten Gentransport nutzen. Ein ROS-responsives Thioketal-basiertes kationisches Polymer wurde synthetisiert, und seine Funktionalisierung mit einem krebssuchenden Peptid führte zur selektiven und verstärkten Gentransfektion in Prostata-Krebszellen (siehe Schema).

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