Hexaethynylbenzene

Authors

  • Dr. Rainer Diercks,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, and the Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94 720 (USA)
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  • James C. Armstrong,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, and the Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94 720 (USA)
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  • Dr. Roland Boese,

    1. Institut für Anorganische Chemie der Universität-Gesamthochschule, Postfach 103764, D-4300 Essen 1 (FRG)
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  • Prof. Dr. K. Peter C. Vollhardt

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, and the Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94 720 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of California, and the Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94 720 (USA)
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  • This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Materials Sciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research, Contract No. DE-AC03-67SF00098). J. C. A. was an IBM Polymer Fellow (1984–1985). R. D. was the recipient of a NATO Science Fellowship (1984–1985). K. P. C. V. is a Miller Research Professor in Residence (1985–1986).

Abstract

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A molecule that doesn't require any introduction, the title compound 1, can be precipitated as a white powder; solutions in polar solvents are stable. 1 forms transition-metal complexes. The ethynyl groups in the precursors with six Me3Si[BOND]C[TRIPLE BOND]C groups on the benzene ring are not exactly linear (X-ray structure analysis).

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