A Camouflaged Icosahedral Carborane: Dodecamethyl-1,12-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12) and Related Compounds

Authors

  • Wei Jiang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA), Telefax: Int. code +(310)825-5490
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  • Dr. Carolyn B. Knobler,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA), Telefax: Int. code +(310)825-5490
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  • Dr. Mark D. Mortimer,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA), Telefax: Int. code +(310)825-5490
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  • Prof. M. Frederick Hawthorne

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA), Telefax: Int. code +(310)825-5490
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (USA), Telefax: Int. code +(310)825-5490
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  • This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant CHE 9314037).

Abstract

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Complete B-methylation is possible for 1,12-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12) derivatives that are substituted on one or both carbon atoms. Electrophilic substitution under harsh conditions affords rigid “hydrocarbon balls” in high yields. An example of these carboranes, the title compound (shown as a space-filling model on the right), has twelve methyl groups arranged in an icosahedral manner and supported on a carborane skeleton.

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