New Brain Lipids that Induce Sleep

Authors

  • Dr. Thomas Kolter,

    1. Institut für Organische Chemie und Biochemie der Universität, Gerhard-Domagk-Strasse 1, D-53121 Bonn (Germany), Telefax: Int. code + (228)737778
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  • Prof. Dr. Konrad Sandhoff

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut für Organische Chemie und Biochemie der Universität, Gerhard-Domagk-Strasse 1, D-53121 Bonn (Germany), Telefax: Int. code + (228)737778
    • Institut für Organische Chemie und Biochemie der Universität, Gerhard-Domagk-Strasse 1, D-53121 Bonn (Germany), Telefax: Int. code + (228)737778
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Abstract

original image

Amide 1 is not the universal sleep-inducing substance, and no appropriate receptors have been found in the brain, but naturally occuring 1 does induce sleep. Compound 1 was found in the cerebrospinal fluid of sleep-deprived animals. Recent research on this compound and others with similar effects have led to a better understanding of the phenomenon of sleep, at least on a molecular level.

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