Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing Protein–Carbohydrate Interactions

Authors

  • Eddie W. Adams,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-253-2979
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Jörn Ueberfeld Dr.,

    1. The Max Tishler Laboratory for Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Daniel M. Ratner,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-253-2979
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  • Barry R. O'Keefe Dr.,

    1. Molecular Targets Development Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
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  • David R. Walt Prof. Dr.,

    1. The Max Tishler Laboratory for Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
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  • Peter H. Seeberger Prof. Dr.

    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-253-2979
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    • Current address: Laboratory for Organic Chemistry. ETH Hönggerberg HCI F 315, Wolfgang Pauli Strasse 10,CH 8093 Zurich.


  • This research was supported by a NDSEG Fellowship (for E.W.A.) and a NIH Biotechnology Training Grant (for D.M.R.). P.H.S. thanks GlaxoSmithKline (Scholar Award), the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (Fellowship) and Merck for financial support. The Tufts effort was supported by a grant from NIH-NIDCR U01 DE14950-01.

Abstract

original image

Protein–carbohydrate interactions can be evaluated by using randomly ordered fiber optic microsphere arrays bearing immobilized synthetic oligosaccharides (see scheme). Two systems are examined: the mannose-binding lectin concanavalin A, and cyanovirin N. The latter allows the simultaneous evaluation of five distinct structures against a carbohydrate-binding protein with unambiguous results.

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