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A High Electrode-Reaction Rate for High-Power-Density Lithium-Ion Secondary Batteries by the Addition of a Lewis Acid

Authors

  • Yuki Kato,

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan, Fax: (+81) 3-5734-2146
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  • Takenobu Ishihara,

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan, Fax: (+81) 3-5734-2146
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  • Hiromasa Ikuta Dr.,

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan, Fax: (+81) 3-5734-2146
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  • Yoshiharu Uchimoto Prof. Dr.,

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan, Fax: (+81) 3-5734-2146
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  • Masataka Wakihara Prof. Dr.

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan, Fax: (+81) 3-5734-2146
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  • This work was supported by Grant-in Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas(B) (No. 740) “Fundamental Studies for Fabrication of All Solid State Ionic Devices” from Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture. We thank Mr. S. Yokoyama and Mr. T. Yabe of NOF Corp. for chemicals.

Abstract

original image

A salt and battery: The charge-transfer reaction at the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is important in the fabrication of high-power-density lithium-ion secondary batteries. This reaction rate is increased by adding a poly(ethylene glycol)–borate ester Lewis acid to the electrolyte. Because the Lewis acid interacts preferentially with anions (X), an increase in the activity of lithium ions is induced by enhancing the dissociation of lithium salts (Li+X, see scheme).

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