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Label-Free Electronic Detection of Thrombin in Blood Serum by Using an Aptamer-Based Sensor

Authors

  • Yi Xiao Dr.,

    1. Department of Physics, Materials Department, and Institute for Polymers and Organic Solids, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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  • Arica A. Lubin,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Program in BioMolecular Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA, Fax: (+1) 805-893-4120
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  • Alan J. Heeger Prof.,

    1. Department of Physics, Materials Department, and Institute for Polymers and Organic Solids, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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  • Kevin W. Plaxco Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Program in BioMolecular Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA, Fax: (+1) 805-893-4120
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  • This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (Grant no.: EB002046) and by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (Grant no.: DAAD19-03-D-0004) from the U.S. Army Research Office. We gratefully acknowledge Brian Baker and Kevin Cash for providing critical commentary and Professor Pierre Petroff for his support.

Abstract

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Blue, gold, and DNA: A methylene blue (MB) tagged, thrombin-binding DNA aptamer immobilized on a gold surface undergoes a large conformational change upon target binding (see schematic representation; eT: electron transfer). This folding produces a large, readily measurable change in redox current and allows the electrochemical detection of thrombin in blood serum.

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