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Water-Soluble Photoluminescent Silicon Quantum Dots

Authors

  • Jamie H. Warner,

    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand, Fax: (+64) 4-463-5237
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  • Akiyoshi Hoshino,

    1. Department of Medical Ecology and Informatics, Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Toyama 1-21-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan
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  • Kenji Yamamoto,

    1. Department of Medical Ecology and Informatics, Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Toyama 1-21-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan
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  • Richard. D. Tilley

    1. School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand, Fax: (+64) 4-463-5237
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  • J.W. and R.D.T. thank the MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology for funding. J.W. and R.D.T. thank H. Rubinsztein-Dunlop for the use of the time-resolved PL spectroscopy system at The University of Queensland.

Abstract

original image

Strong photoluminescence in the blue region of the visible spectrum was observed for a dispersion of allylamine-capped silicon quantum dots in water. Their ease of synthesis and optical properties make them excellent candidates for biomedical applications, as demonstrated by their incorporation inside the cytosol of HeLa cells (see microscopy image, the inset shows the fluorescence from the silicon quantum dots on excitation with UV light).

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