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Nanoparticle Assemblies with Molecular Springs: A Nanoscale Thermometer

Authors

  • Jaebeom Lee Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA, Fax: (+1) 734-764-7454
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  • Alexander O. Govorov Prof. Dr.,

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA
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  • Nicholas A. Kotov Prof. Dr.

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA, Fax: (+1) 734-764-7454
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  • This work was supported in part by an NSF-CAREER award (N.A.K.), NSF-Biophotonics (N.A.K.), AFOSR (N.A.K.), the University of Michigan (N.A.K.), and Ohio University (A.O.G.).

Abstract

original image

A temperature-dependent emission is observed for CdTe nanoparticles connected to Au nanoparticles by a flexible poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) link acting as a molecular spring (see picture). The extension of the PEG springs varies depending on the temperature, which causes variations in CdTe emission caused by plasmon–exciton interactions. A theoretical model of plasmon–exciton coupling explains the optical and thermal effects.

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