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Programmable Cell Adhesion Encoded by DNA Hybridization

Authors

  • Ravi A. Chandra,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Erik S. Douglas,

    1. UCB/UCSF Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Richard A. Mathies Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and UCB/UCSF Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley
    2. Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Carolyn R. Bertozzi Prof.,

    1. Departments of Chemistry & Molecular and Cell Biology
    2. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley
    3. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Matthew B. Francis Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
    2. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, Fax: (+1) 510-643-3079
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  • The authors thank H. Lee, J. Prescher, M. Hangauer, and N. Toriello for helpful discussions and assistance. R.A.C. and E.S.D. were supported by National Science Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships. This work was supported by generous financial support from the Nanoscale Science, Energy, and Technology (NSET) Program of the Department of Energy.

Abstract

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Stuck-on genes: Live cells functionalized with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides bind, independent of native adhesion mechanisms, to substrates that bear complementary DNA strands in a sequence-specific manner. This strategy has been successfully utilized with several common mammalian cell lines and device platforms.

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