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Intrinsic Electric Dipole Fields and the Induction of Hierarchical Form Developments in Fluorapatite–Gelatine Nanocomposites: A General Principle for Morphogenesis of Biominerals?

Authors

  • Paul Simon Dr.,

    1. Max Planck Institute for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden, Germany, Fax: (+49) 351-46-460-3002
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  • Dirk Zahn Dr.,

    1. Max Planck Institute for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden, Germany, Fax: (+49) 351-46-460-3002
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  • Hannes Lichte Prof. Dr.,

    1. Institute of Structure Physics, Triebenberg Laboratory for High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Holography, Technical University of Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden Zaschendorf, Germany
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  • Rüdiger Kniep Prof. Dr.

    1. Max Planck Institute for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden, Germany, Fax: (+49) 351-46-460-3002
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  • We thank the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie for generous support. We also thank Dr. W. Carrillo-Cabrera and Dr. P. Formanek for fruitful discussions and experimental help with FIB.

Abstract

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The seeder of the pack: The electrical potential distribution (see phase image of an electron hologram) around the basal plane close to the prism faces of a hexagonal fluorapatite–gelatine nanocomposite seed influences the growth of the nanocomposite. The seed consists of elementary dipoles on the nanometer scale, which all have the same orientation along the c axis of the composite seed. Further form development of the seed leads to fractal patterns.

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