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Proteolytic Actuation of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly

Authors

  • Todd J. Harris,

    1. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E19-502D Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-324-0710
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    • These authors contributed equally

  • Geoffrey von Maltzahn,

    1. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E19-502D Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-324-0710
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    • These authors contributed equally

  • Austin M. Derfus,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • Erkki Ruoslahti,

    1. Burnham Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia Prof.

    1. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E19-502D Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-324-0710
    2. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science/MIT, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
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  • This work was supported by NCI/NASA (N01-CO37117) and NCI (U54 CA119349 and U54 CA119335). T.J.H. acknowledges support from the NIH-NIBIB (EB 006324). G.v.M. acknowledges support from the Whitaker Foundation. We thank Dr. Daniel Sodickson and Dr. Aaron Grant for assistance with MRI, Dr. Deborah Burstein at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for the use of the 4.7T MRI, Yusuke Nagai for help with atomic force microscopy, and Dr. Michael Sailor for helpful discussions.

Abstract

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Sleeping giant: Inorganic nanoparticles are synthesized to exist in a latent form until proteolytic activation drives them to self-assemble into nanostructures with amplified magnetic properties. Binding of complimentary Fe3O4 nanoparticles is blocked by the attachment of inhibitory polymers that may be removed by proteases involved in cancer-cell invasion and metastasis.

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