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“Click” Chemistry by Microcontact Printing

Authors

  • Dorota I. Rozkiewicz,

    1. Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands, Fax: (+31) 53-489-4645
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  • Dominik Jańczewski Dr.,

    1. Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands, Fax: (+31) 53-489-4645
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  • Willem Verboom Dr.,

    1. Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands, Fax: (+31) 53-489-4645
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  • Bart Jan Ravoo Dr.,

    1. Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands, Fax: (+31) 53-489-4645
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  • David N. Reinhoudt Prof. Dr.

    1. Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands, Fax: (+31) 53-489-4645
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  • D.N.R. is grateful to Prof. C. Chidsey for discussions. This work was supported by NanoImpuls/NanoNed, the nanotechnology program of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (grant TTF6329).

Abstract

original image

Print and click: “Click” chemistry can be efficiently combined with microcontact printing. Synthesis in the nanoscale confinement between an elastomeric stamp and a reactive substrate leads to the desired product within a short time, without a catalyst, and under ambient conditions. As a result, 1-octadecyne could be printed onto an azido-terminated, self-assembled monolayer on a silicon oxide substrate (see scheme).

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