Fabrication of Monodisperse Gel Shells and Functional Microgels in Microfluidic Devices

Authors

  • Jin-Woong Kim Dr.,

    1. DEAS and Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-495-2875
    2. Amore-Pacific R&D Center, 314-1, Bora-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-729, Korea
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  • Andrew S. Utada,

    1. DEAS and Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-495-2875
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  • Alberto Fernández-Nieves Dr.,

    1. DEAS and Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-495-2875
    2. Interdisciplinary Network of Emerging Science and Technology (INEST) Group, Research Center, Phillip Morris USA, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
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  • Zhibing Hu Prof.,

    1. Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
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  • David A. Weitz Prof.

    1. DEAS and Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA, Fax: (+1) 617-495-2875
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  • This work was supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of Korea Research Foundation (KRF) and Amore-Pacific Co. (Korea), and by the NSF (DMR-0602684 (D.A.W.) and DMR-0507208 (Z.H.)) and the Harvard MRSEC (DMR-0213805). A.F.-N. is grateful to the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia (MAT2004-03581) and to the University of Almeria (leave of absence). INEST Group is sponsored by PMUSA.

Abstract

original image

Microgel structures such as spherical microgel shells (picture on the upper left) and spherical microgel particles that incorporate quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and polymer microparticles (other images) have been prepared by a capillary microfluidic technique. Because these particles change their volume with changes in temperature, they may find application in, for example, drug delivery.

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