Cover Picture: Massively Parallel Dip–Pen Nanolithography with 55 000-Pen Two-Dimensional Arrays (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 43/2006)

Authors

  • Khalid Salaita,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Medicine, and International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-467-5123
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Yuhuang Wang,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Medicine, and International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-467-5123
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Joseph Fragala,

    1. NanoInk, Inc. 215 E. Hacienda Avenue, Campbell, CA 95008-6616, USA
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  • Rafael A. Vega,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Medicine, and International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-467-5123
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  • Chang Liu Prof.,

    1. Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, IL 61801-2355, USA
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  • Chad A. Mirkin Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Medicine, and International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-467-5123
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Abstract

Massively parallel dip–pen nanolithography is possible when 55 000 AFM cantilevers are used to write molecules directly onto a surface. An optical micrograph shows the surface after etching (cover picture, left), and each round feature is a miniature image of the face of Thomas Jefferson (AFM image, right), who helped develop the polygraph, a duplicator based on an array of pens. For more information on the new technique see the Communication by C. A. Mirkin and co-workers on page 7220 ff.

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