Facile Preparation of Complex Protein Architectures with Sub-100-nm Resolution on Surfaces

Authors

  • Sean R. Coyer,

    1. IBM Research GmbH, Zurich Research Laboratory, 8803 Rüschlikon, Switzerland, Fax: (+41) 44-724-8966
    2. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0363, USA
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  • Andrés J. García Prof.,

    1. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0363, USA
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  • Emmanuel Delamarche Dr.

    1. IBM Research GmbH, Zurich Research Laboratory, 8803 Rüschlikon, Switzerland, Fax: (+41) 44-724-8966
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  • We thank H. Riel, E. Lörtscher, T. Kraus, L. Malaquin, H. Wolf, and U. Drechsler for their support with the fabrication of the nanotemplates, and J. P. Renault, M. Zimmermann, and D. J. Solis for discussions. E.D. acknowledges partial support from the State Secretariat for Education and Research (SEC) within the framework of the EC-funded project NaPa (NMP4-CT-2003–500120). Partial funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health (R01-GM065918 to A.J.G), and the Whitaker International Fellows and Scholars Program (to S.R.C.). We also thank W. Riess and P. Seidler for their continuous support.

Abstract

original image

Ink, subtract, print: A novel method is developed for patterning proteins into complex architectures with high resolution, high contrast, and self-alignment (see fluorescence micrographs). An elastomer is inked with proteins, and a nanotemplate is used to selectively subtract proteins, leaving a pattern that is then printed onto a substrate.

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