A Torsional Strain Mechanism To Tune Pitch in Supramolecular Helices

Authors

  • Liang-shi Li Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-491-3010
    2. Permanent address: Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
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  • Hongzhou Jiang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
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  • Benjamin W. Messmore,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-491-3010
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  • Steve R. Bull,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-491-3010
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  • Samuel I. Stupp Prof. Dr.

    1. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA, Fax: (+1) 847-491-3010
    2. Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
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  • This work was supported by the US Department of Energy and by the National Science Foundation.

Abstract

original image

On the turn: Torsional strain has been used to control the pitch of helical nanostructures in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. In this method, sterically induced torsional strain on the primary helices forces the secondary helices into superhelices, with the pitch tunable depending on the magnitude of the strain. UV radiation can be used to switch the pitch of specific helical nanostructures (see AFM images).

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