Fullerenes: Multitask Components in Molecular Machinery

Authors

  • Aurelio Mateo-Alonso Dr.,

    1. Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche and Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Unità di Trieste, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, Fax: (+39) 040-52572
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  • Dirk M. Guldi Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy & Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen, Germany, Fax: (+49) 91-318528307
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  • Francesco Paolucci Prof.,

    1. Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Università di Bologna via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna, Italy, Fax: (+39) 051-2099456
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  • Maurizio Prato Prof.

    1. Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche and Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Unità di Trieste, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, Fax: (+39) 040-52572
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Abstract

Molecular machines are molecular-scale devices that carry out predetermined tasks derived from molecular motion. This Minireview illustrates how fullerenes can be used as multitask building blocks in molecular machinery, providing new perspectives for fullerenes. Indeed, C60 can be applied as a photo- and electroactive stopper owing to its size, as a probe for molecular motion as a result of its well-defined physicochemical properties, and to induce motion through π–π interactions. Such molecular motion can be employed to modulate light-driven electron-transfer events, extending the potential applications of molecular machines to the typical fields of application of fullerenes.

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