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The Binary Selenium(IV) Azides Se(N3)4, [Se(N3)5], and [Se(N3)6]2−

Authors

  • Thomas M. Klapötke Prof. Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Butenandtstrasse 5–13(D), 81377 Munich, Germany, Fax: (+49) 89-2180-77492
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  • Burkhard Krumm Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Butenandtstrasse 5–13(D), 81377 Munich, Germany, Fax: (+49) 89-2180-77492
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  • Matthias Scherr Dipl.-Chem.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Butenandtstrasse 5–13(D), 81377 Munich, Germany, Fax: (+49) 89-2180-77492
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  • Ralf Haiges Dr.,

    1. Loker Research Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661, USA, Fax: (+1) 213-740-6679
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  • Karl O. Christe Prof. Dr.

    1. Loker Research Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661, USA, Fax: (+1) 213-740-6679
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  • Financial support from the University of Munich, the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KL 636/10-1), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0456343), and the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

Abstract

original image

Black, red, gold: The reaction of SeF4 with Me3SiN3 at low temperatures results in the formation of the first binary selenium(IV) azide Se(N3)4. The decomposition in an NMR tube shows the colors of gray selenium, red selenium, and the desired yellow selenium tetraazide (see picture). The reactions of [SeF5] and [SeF6]2− with Me3SiN3 furnish the corresponding polyazidoselenites [Se(N3)5] and [Se(N3)6]2−. All materials are extremely temperature-sensitive.

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