Addition of an α-Hydroxy Acid to the Genetic Code of Bacteria

Authors

  • Jiantao Guo,

    1. Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA, Fax: (+1) 858-784-9440
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Jiangyun Wang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA, Fax: (+1) 858-784-9440
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • J. Christopher Anderson Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA, Fax: (+1) 858-784-9440
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, 306 Stanley Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762, USA
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  • Peter G. Schultz Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA, Fax: (+1) 858-784-9440
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  • We thank Bill Webb for help in protein mass spectrometry, and we are grateful to the DOE (ER46051) and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology for support. We thank Dr. M. Sever and Dr. W. Liu for helpful discussion.

Abstract

original image

Playing tag: The α-hydroxy acid p-hydroxy-L-phenyllactic acid has been genetically incorporated into proteins in E. coli in response to an amber nonsense codon. The site-specific introduction of backbone ester mutations was used for the site-specific hydrolysis of an affinity tag, as well as for determination of the energetic contributions of backbone hydrogen bonds to protein stability.

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