Microbial Synthesis of CdS Nanocrystals in Genetically Engineered E. coli

Authors

  • Seung Hyun Kang,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Bourns Hall A242, Riverside, CA 92521 (USA), Fax: (+1) 951-827-5696
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  • Krassimir N. Bozhilov Dr.,

    1. Central Facility for Advanced Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (USA)
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  • Nosang V. Myung Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Bourns Hall A242, Riverside, CA 92521 (USA), Fax: (+1) 951-827-5696
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  • Ashok Mulchandani Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Bourns Hall A242, Riverside, CA 92521 (USA), Fax: (+1) 951-827-5696
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  • Wilfred Chen Prof.

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, Bourns Hall A242, Riverside, CA 92521 (USA), Fax: (+1) 951-827-5696
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  • We thank the NSF (BES0422791 and BES0329482) for financial support of this research. We also thank Dr. Georgiou for kindly providing E. coli strain R189.

Abstract

original image

A bacterial biofactory: Escherichia coli strains were genetically engineered to produce phytochelatins (PCs) as capping agents and used for the intracellular synthesis of fluorescent and water-soluble PC-coated CdS nanoparticles (see figure). The size of the semiconductor nanocrystals could be tuned by controlling the population of the capping PCs. SpPCS is the PC synthase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe; GSHI*=γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

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