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Aerobic Oxidation of Hydroquinone Derivatives Catalyzed by Polymer-Incarcerated Platinum Catalyst

Authors

  • Hiroyuki Miyamura,

    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, The HFRE Division, ERATO (Japan) Science Technology Agency (JST), Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
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  • Mika Shiramizu,

    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, The HFRE Division, ERATO (Japan) Science Technology Agency (JST), Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
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  • Ryosuke Matsubara Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, The HFRE Division, ERATO (Japan) Science Technology Agency (JST), Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
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  • Shū Kobayashi Prof. Dr.

    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, The HFRE Division, ERATO (Japan) Science Technology Agency (JST), Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
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  • This work was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Japan Society of the Promotion of Science (JSPS). H.M. thanks the JSPS Fellowship for Japanese Junior Scientists.

Abstract

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It's a lock-in! A remarkably wide substrate scope of hydroquinones are oxidized to quinones in high yields in a platinum-catalyzed process with as low as 0.05 mol % catalyst. The aerobic oxidation is catalyzed by platinum nanoclusters trapped in a styrene-based polymer network (see scheme, PI Pt=polymer-incarcerated nanoclusters). The catalyst could be reused at least 13 times without any loss of catalytic activity.

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