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Label-Free Pathogen Detection with Sensor Chips Assembled from Peptide Nanotubes

Authors

  • Roberto de la Rica Dr.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, City University of New York—Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA), Fax: (+1) 212-650-3918
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  • Ernest Mendoza Dr.,

    1. Nanobiosensors and Molecular Nanobiophysics Group, Research Center on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2), CSIC-ICN, ETSE, Campus UAB-Edificio Q, 08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)
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  • Laura M. Lechuga Dr.,

    1. Nanobiosensors and Molecular Nanobiophysics Group, Research Center on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2), CSIC-ICN, ETSE, Campus UAB-Edificio Q, 08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)
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  • Hiroshi Matsui Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, City University of New York—Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA), Fax: (+1) 212-650-3918
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  • Parts of the research on antibody nanotube synthesis and the surface alignment of the nanotubes were supported by the US Department of Energy (DE-FG-02-01ER45935). The AC impedance measurements and the capacitance analysis of viruses were supported by the National Science Foundation (ECCS-0823902). The Hunter College infrastructure is supported by the National Institutes of Health and the RCMI program (G12-RR-03037). E.M. acknowledges the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia for a Ramon y Cajal contract. The microelectrodes were fabricated at MC2 Nanofabrication Laboratory, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; their fabrication was financed by the FP6—Research Infrastructures program MC2ACCESS (026029).

Abstract

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A robust viral sensor was developed by bridging a pair of gold electrodes with antibody-coated peptide nanotubes. The nanotubes concentrated the target virus on their surface by molecular recognition between the antibody and the virus (see picture). The nanotubes fit perfectly within the electric field line distribution to enable the extremely sensitive impedimetric detection of viral particles.

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