DNA Origami as a Nanoscopic Ruler for Super-Resolution Microscopy

Authors

  • Christian Steinhauer,

    1. Angewandte Physik—Biophysik & Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Amalienstrasse 54, 80799 München (Germany), Fax: (+49) 89-2180-2050
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Ralf Jungmann,

    1. Physics Department E14 & Center for Nanoscience, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 89-289-13820
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Thomas L. Sobey,

    1. Physics Department E14 & Center for Nanoscience, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 89-289-13820
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  • Friedrich C. Simmel Prof. Dr.,

    1. Physics Department E14 & Center for Nanoscience, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 89-289-13820
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  • Philip Tinnefeld Prof. Dr.

    1. Angewandte Physik—Biophysik & Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Amalienstrasse 54, 80799 München (Germany), Fax: (+49) 89-2180-2050
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  • We are grateful to Rob Fee and Helene Budjarek for experimental support, and Paul Rothemund for helpful advice. This work was supported by the DFG (Inst 86/1051-1), the Biophotonics Program of the BMBF/VDI, the Nanosystems Initiative Munich, the LMU Center for Nanoscience, and the Elitenetzwerk Bayern.

Abstract

original image

Resolving the distances: Rectangular DNA origami labeled with fluorophores at specific positions has been used as a nanoscopic ruler. Super-resolution microscopy based on the subsequent localization of single molecules enables two fluorophores at a distance of about 90 nm to be optically resolved. This combination of subdiffraction imaging and DNA nanotechnology opens up new avenues for studying nanostructures and their dynamics.

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