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Highly Efficient “Grafting onto” a Polypeptide Backbone Using Click Chemistry

Authors

  • Amanda C. Engler,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), Fax: (+1) 617-258-7577
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  • Hyung-il Lee,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), Fax: (+1) 617-258-7577
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea)
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  • Paula T. Hammond Prof.

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), Fax: (+1) 617-258-7577
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  • The authors thank the US EPA, Science to Achieve Results Graduate Fellowship and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology. The authors would also like to thank Mary Engler, Byeong-Su Kim, Ryan Moslin, and Glen Ramsay for their helpful discussions, and Dr. Li Li for obtaining the mass spectrometry data. The research described in this paper has been funded wholly, or in part, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under the Science to Achieve Results Graduate Fellowship Program. The EPA has not officially endorsed this publication and the views expressed herein may not reflect the views of the EPA.

Abstract

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“Clicked” into place: Densely grafted poly(γ-propargyl-L-glutamate)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) polypeptides have been synthesized by combining ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides with click chemistry. Various lengths of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains (750 g mol−1 to 5000 g mol−1) were attached to a rigid α-helical poly(γ-propargyl-L-glutamate); extremely high grafting efficiencies of over 96 % were achieved.

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