The Engineering of an Orally Active Conotoxin for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

Authors

  • Richard J. Clark Dr.,

    1. Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 7-3346-2101
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  • Jonas Jensen,

    1. Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 7-3346-2101
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  • Simon T. Nevin Dr.,

    1. Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)
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  • Brid P. Callaghan Dr.,

    1. Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)
    2. Current address: Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Melbourne, Victoria 3083 (Australia)
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  • David J. Adams Prof.,

    1. Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)
    2. Current address: Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Melbourne, Victoria 3083 (Australia)
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  • David J. Craik Prof.

    1. Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia), Fax: (+61) 7-3346-2101
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  • Work in our laboratory on cyclic conotoxins is supported by grants from the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). D.J.C. is a NHMRC Principal Research Fellow. R.J.C. is a NHMRC Biomedical Career Development Award Fellow. We gratefully acknowledge access to the facilities of the ARC Special Research Centre for Functional and Applied Genomics.

Abstract

original image

From killers to curers: Peptides from cone snail venoms are potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, these peptides suffer from the disadvantage of short biological half-lives and poor activity when taken orally. A new orally active conotoxin was developed to solve these problems.

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