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PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Dr. Ajay S. Karakoti,

    1. Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, PNNL, Richland WA
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  • Dr. Soumen Das,

    1. NanoScience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fl-32816 (USA)
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  • Dr. Suntharampillai Thevuthasan,

    1. Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, PNNL, Richland WA
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  • Prof. Sudipta Seal

    Corresponding author
    1. NanoScience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fl-32816 (USA)
    2. Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fl-32816 (USA)
    3. Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fl-32816 (USA)
    • NanoScience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fl-32816 (USA)
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Abstract

Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in the targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long-term stability, and attachment of selective functional groups. This Minireview describes the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the surface modification of oxides and focuses on their biomedical applications. Such a PEGylation of surfaces provides “stealth” characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The role of PEG as structure-directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also presented.

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