A Stable Molecular Entity Derived from Rare Iron(II) Minerals: The Square-Planar High-Spin-d6 FeIIO4 Chromophore

Authors

  • Xaver Wurzenberger,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstrasse 5–13, 81377 Munich (Germany) kluefcup.uni-muenchen.de
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  • Dr. Holger Piotrowski,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstrasse 5–13, 81377 Munich (Germany) kluefcup.uni-muenchen.de
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  • Prof. Dr. Peter Klüfers

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstrasse 5–13, 81377 Munich (Germany) kluefcup.uni-muenchen.de
    • Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstrasse 5–13, 81377 Munich (Germany) kluefcup.uni-muenchen.de
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  • We are indebted to Dr. R. Hochleitner, Mineralogische Staatssammlung München, for the eudialyte photograph, to Dr. E. Bedbur, Geologisches und Mineralogisches Museum der Universität Kiel, for the gillespite photograph, and W. Bauer for the SQUID measurements.

Abstract

original image

The odd couple: The red chromophore of both the rare silicate mineral gillespite (BaFeSi4O10; see picture, left, on sanbornite, BaSi2O5) and the bis(meso-oxolanediolato)ferrate(II) anion in its lithium salt (right) is the square-planar, high-spin-d6 ferrous center. The unusual combination of structure and spin state for the FeO4 moiety is not forced by a rigid environment of the central metal, but rather results from an intrinsically stable entity.

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