Stabilization of 200-Atom Platinum Nanoparticles by Organosilane Fragments

Authors

  • Dr. Katrin Pelzer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department for Inorganic Chemistry, Faradayweg 4–6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
    2. Present address: Laboratoire Chimie Provence UMR 6264, Université d'Aix-Marseille I, Bâtiment Madirel, Campus St. Jérôme, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)
    • Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department for Inorganic Chemistry, Faradayweg 4–6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Michael Hävecker,

    1. Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department for Inorganic Chemistry, Faradayweg 4–6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
    2. Present address: Department of Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin / BESSY II, Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Malika Boualleg,

    1. C2P2-LCOMS, UMR CNRS-CPE 5265, Villeurbanne (France)
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  • Prof. Jean-Pierre Candy,

    1. C2P2-LCOMS, UMR CNRS-CPE 5265, Villeurbanne (France)
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  • Prof. Jean-Marie Basset

    Corresponding author
    1. C2P2-LCOMS, UMR CNRS-CPE 5265, Villeurbanne (France)
    2. Present address: KAUST Catalytic Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)
    • C2P2-LCOMS, UMR CNRS-CPE 5265, Villeurbanne (France)
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Abstract

original image

Three's a charm: Platinum nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter and containing approximately 200 atoms covered with n-octylsilyl groups (see picture, right; Pt blue, Si red, C gray, H turquoise) form when [Pt(dba)2] (dba=dibenzylideneacetone) decomposes in the presence of n-octylsilane. The particles adopt a cuboctahedral structure with an edge length of three atoms.

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