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Fluorogenic DNAzyme Probes as Bacterial Indicators

Authors

  • Dr. M. Monsur Ali,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada), Fax: (+1) 905-522-9033
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  • Sergio D. Aguirre,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada), Fax: (+1) 905-522-9033
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  • Dr. Hadeer Lazim,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada), Fax: (+1) 905-522-9033
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  • Prof. Dr. Yingfu Li

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada), Fax: (+1) 905-522-9033
    • Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada), Fax: (+1) 905-522-9033
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  • This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and Sentinel Bioactive Paper Network. Y.L. is a Canada Research Chair.

Abstract

original image

Lighting up bacteria: An RNA-cleaving fluorescent DNAzyme (RFD) can produce a fluorescent signal in the crude extracellular mixture generated by live bacterial cells (see picture). These DNAzymes cleave a lone RNA linkage (R) embedded in a DNA chain and flanked by nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore (F) and a quencher (Q).

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