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Patchy, Anisotropic Microspheres with Soft Protein Islets

Authors

  • Kaladhar Kamalasanan,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    3. Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    4. The McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • Siddharth Jhunjhunwala,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    2. The McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • Jiamin Wu,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • Alexandra Swanson,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • Di Gao,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • Steven R. Little

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    3. Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    4. The McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)
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  • We thank the Center for Biological Imaging (University of Pittsburgh) for performing confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. We also thank Mintai Peter Hwang for help with the graphics. This work was funded by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation.

Abstract

original image

Useful contacts: A new method to achieve regular patterns generates anisotropic, “patchy” microspheres by using interfacial condensation of a liquid mask and the proximity of the particles to their neighbors to determine a mask pattern. The microspheres are separated from the scaffold and labeled with a first protein at non-mask regions (green) followed by removal of the mask and immobilization of a second protein (red).

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