Coverage Control of DNA Crystals Grown by Silica Assistance

Authors

  • Junwye Lee,

    1. Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Sunho Kim,

    1. School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Junghoon Kim,

    1. Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
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  • Dr. Chang-Won Lee,

    1. Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), Yongin 446-712 (Korea)
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  • Prof. Yonghan Roh,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
    • School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
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  • Prof. Sung Ha Park

    Corresponding author
    1. Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
    • Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea)
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  • This work was supported by the Joint Research Project under the KOSEF-JSPS Cooperative Program (F01-2009-000-10205-0) to S.H.P and by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. R01-2008-000-20582-0) to Y.R.

Abstract

original image

A surface-assisted fabrication scheme enables direct surface coverage control of functionalized DNA nanostructures on centimeter-scaled silica (SiO2) substrates from 0 to 100 % (see picture). Electrostatic interactions between the DNA structures and the surface lead to dramatic topological changes of the structures, thereby creating novel formations of the crystals.

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