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Engineered Bacterially Expressed Polypeptides: Assembly into Polymer Particles with Tailored Degradation Profiles

Authors

  • Denison H. C. Chang,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Dr. Angus P. R. Johnston,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Dr. Kim L. Wark,

    1. CSIRO, Molecular and Health Technologies, 343 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia)
    2. Current address: Victorian Cancer Agency, 12 Victoria Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)
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  • Kerry Breheney,

    1. CSIRO, Molecular and Health Technologies, 343 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia)
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  • Prof. Frank Caruso

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • This work was supported by the Australian Research Council under the Federation Fellowship (FF0776078) and Discovery Project (DP0877360) schemes. We thank Dr. Henk Dam for his assistance with mass spectrometry, Dr. Christopher J. Ochs and Dr. Zhiyuan Zhu for their assistance with NMR analysis, and Dr. Lillian Lee for her assistance with CD spectroscopy.

Abstract

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In nature, the sequence of amino acids in a protein is determined by the genetic code. Biosynthesis of polypeptides by bacteria can be used to exploit this natural process to afford exact control over properties such as molecular weight, chemical functionality, and structure. It is demonstrated how control over the positioning of functional groups can be used to tune the degradation of assembled polypeptide particles (see scheme).

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